Nursing Home Employees Charged with Failure to Care for Residents and Altering Medical Records

A hidden-camera investigation led to charges Wednesday against eight nursing home employees. The camera, placed in the room of a female patient with her family's consent, revealed that records were falsified to cover up the lack of proper care at the home, the State Attorney General said.

After a seven-week investigation, the attorney general's office observed a certified nurse's aide failed to provide the patient with the range-of-motion therapy that prevents muscles from seizing and that two nurses failed to administer insulin, treat skin and wounds, and check vital signs. Each faces a felony count of falsifying business records since the records say that these operation had been performed as required.

The state officials also charged five certified nurse's aides with endangering the welfare of an incompetent or physically disabled person. They are accused of repeatedly failing to use a mechanical lift to transfer the woman in and out of bed, risking injury.

The president of the company which owns the nursing home said in a statement that the facility learned of the allegations just last week and began an internal investigation that showed these were only "isolated occurrences" and no harm was caused to the residents. One of the eight employees no longer works for the company while the other seven have been suspended.

The facility with about 220 beds and 650 employees, has a history of financial and quality issues. The federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid rates it "much below average" based on the state Health Department's recent inspections. For more, read the story.

 


Robert W. Carter,  Jr. is a Virginia attorney whose law practice is dedicated to protecting the rights of the victims of nursing home and assisted living neglect and abuse in Richmond, Roanoke, Norfolk, Lynchburg, Danville, Charlottesville, and across Virginia.